Why Use LinkedIn?

This post will be about how I’ve used LinkedIn in my career and how recruiters on LinkedIn or otherwise can be used as a tool as well.

What Is LinkedIn?

If you are a working professional, you’ve probably heard of LinkedIn. At least for the English speaking, North American job markets. Like other professional job searching sites like Glassdoor, Hired, and Indeed, LinkedIn allows you to upload a resume and makes it searchable by companies and recruiters. Similarly, you can search and apply for jobs. It’s different for its social networking. I think of it as “Facebook for work “. It’s a lot less awkward to share your LinkedIn details than your Facebook profile. LinkedIn is a Microsoft acquisition. Back when that happened we bemoaned the data they’d be taking from us. Now, we’ve more or less forgotten.

Using LinkedIn To Your Advantage

Fishing For Jobs

By frequently updating your profile, you show up in more search results. This will boost you in “recently updated” results. The other way you show up in search results is keywords in your descriptions. Make sure to put a buzzword filled description for your work histories.

A “Living” Resume

Several companies often take a snapshot of your LinkedIn profile instead of a resume. This means you don’t need to spend time fiddling with font size and margins to fit that extra internship on one page. This is another reason to make your profile detailed. Since there aren’t any length restrictions on your LinkedIn profile, it’s a good opportunity to add more information about your past work.

Following Up

When a prospective recruiter, manager, or client meets with you, get their LinkedIn details. This is a great way to follow up because you can stalk them to get a better picture of the company they work for and their work history. Just a reminder: following up is a great way to improve your chances of landing a a client or job.

Other Uses Of LinkedIn

Recruiting

You can use LinkedIn to recruit old coworkers or find people to be your referral bonuses but I don’t. Occasionally if I know a position will help someone, sure, I’ll shoot them a message. I don’t want to turn into a part-time recruiter.

Job Searching

For a site that’s strongly advertised as a job hunting tool, it’s not the most diverse. You can only search for on-site, full-time positions. You can search for jobs in Remote, Oregon but not remote working positions. Sites like Remotive and We Work Remotely are better for jobs you can do anywhere. Even Remote, Oregon.

Watching Companies Or People

Watching people or companies is useful if you track company performance for investments. You may also be looking for information on lay-offs or massive hiring initiatives. You could also follow business leaders that inspire you for opportunities to hear them speak or read books they’ve published. This is a way to understand trends in your industry and adapt to them… only if they’re a large enough company to spend money on social media specialists.

Getting Industry News

Like watching companies or people, you can get news digests for your industry. Sometimes I’ll take a look and get a simple digest of information. It’s a mix of study results, platitudes from leaders, and gossip. This is a good source of water cooler topics.

Joining Groups

Half the time I forget this is a feature because of how hard it is to make use of it. There are alumni groups for schools and companies. The idea is to be able to refer jobs to group members and potentially mentor people. As with any internet social media groups, they vary widely. Group conversations are more fun on a casual forum like slack so I use that instead.

How LinkedIn Is Getting Me Closer To My Dream Job

LinkedIn can help get you a dream job. It’s not the best fit because I’m looking for remote, part-time, or freelance work. It can still be useful. Some of those irritating features helped connect me with work I wanted.

Following Up

Following up is really important. I think this is the third time I’ve said this in this post but it’s worth reiterating. Your potential clients aren’t going to contact you if they’re busy (which they often are) or maybe they a client for a few months down the line instead of today. LinkedIn in as a great way to take a name and turn it into a picture of a person or company along with a way to contact them and see what they’re putting out there. It also allows you to see their connections and find more potential clients. Typically, people in similar business or career stages cluster. So, what if this person was a “miss”? You can also check out their company to see what things you should avoid.

Call My Bluff, I Dare You

Recruiters are like a fungus: they bloom, you wipe them out, they lie in wait, and return with equal or greater power later. At first, I ignored them or declined connections. After a while, I wondered what they would do if I asked for a part-time, remote contract. When I did, a lot of them backed off and didn’t come back. However, there were a few who started a discussion.

I think of these as the “good” recruiters. They didn’t give up when I gave them these difficult requirements, they started to ask why I needed them and what types of negotiation I’d be willing to do. I started building potential work schedules in my head: 20 hours per week onsite, 30 hours per week remote, or fully remote 3 month contract. Surprisingly, they went out and came back with jobs meeting these criteria. Not only that, they frequently followed up to tell me how the search was going and which companies were interested in my work proposal.

The takeaway: if you can come up with a job worth talking to a recruiter for, they might find it for you.

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