Why Use LinkedIn?

This post will be about how I’ve used LinkedIn in my career and how recruiters on LinkedIn or otherwise can be used as a tool as well.

What Is LinkedIn?

If you are a working professional, you’ve probably heard of LinkedIn. At least for the English speaking, North American job markets. Like other professional job searching sites like Glassdoor, Hired, and Indeed, LinkedIn allows you to upload a resume and makes it searchable by companies and recruiters. Similarly, you can search and apply for jobs. It’s different for its social networking. I think of it as “Facebook for work “. It’s a lot less awkward to share your LinkedIn details than your Facebook profile. LinkedIn is a Microsoft acquisition. Back when that happened we bemoaned the data they’d be taking from us. Now, we’ve more or less forgotten.

Using LinkedIn To Your Advantage

Fishing For Jobs

By frequently updating your profile, you show up in more search results. This will boost you in “recently updated” results. The other way you show up in search results is keywords in your descriptions. Make sure to put a buzzword filled description for your work histories.

A “Living” Resume

Several companies often take a snapshot of your LinkedIn profile instead of a resume. This means you don’t need to spend time fiddling with font size and margins to fit that extra internship on one page. This is another reason to make your profile detailed. Since there aren’t any length restrictions on your LinkedIn profile, it’s a good opportunity to add more information about your past work.

Following Up

When a prospective recruiter, manager, or client meets with you, get their LinkedIn details. This is a great way to follow up because you can stalk them to get a better picture of the company they work for and their work history. Just a reminder: following up is a great way to improve your chances of landing a a client or job.

Other Uses Of LinkedIn

Recruiting

You can use LinkedIn to recruit old coworkers or find people to be your referral bonuses but I don’t. Occasionally if I know a position will help someone, sure, I’ll shoot them a message. I don’t want to turn into a part-time recruiter.

Job Searching

For a site that’s strongly advertised as a job hunting tool, it’s not the most diverse. You can only search for on-site, full-time positions. You can search for jobs in Remote, Oregon but not remote working positions. Sites like Remotive and We Work Remotely are better for jobs you can do anywhere. Even Remote, Oregon.

Watching Companies Or People

Watching people or companies is useful if you track company performance for investments. You may also be looking for information on lay-offs or massive hiring initiatives. You could also follow business leaders that inspire you for opportunities to hear them speak or read books they’ve published. This is a way to understand trends in your industry and adapt to them… only if they’re a large enough company to spend money on social media specialists.

Getting Industry News

Like watching companies or people, you can get news digests for your industry. Sometimes I’ll take a look and get a simple digest of information. It’s a mix of study results, platitudes from leaders, and gossip. This is a good source of water cooler topics.

Joining Groups

Half the time I forget this is a feature because of how hard it is to make use of it. There are alumni groups for schools and companies. The idea is to be able to refer jobs to group members and potentially mentor people. As with any internet social media groups, they vary widely. Group conversations are more fun on a casual forum like slack so I use that instead.

How LinkedIn Is Getting Me Closer To My Dream Job

LinkedIn can help get you a dream job. It’s not the best fit because I’m looking for remote, part-time, or freelance work. It can still be useful. Some of those irritating features helped connect me with work I wanted.

Following Up

Following up is really important. I think this is the third time I’ve said this in this post but it’s worth reiterating. Your potential clients aren’t going to contact you if they’re busy (which they often are) or maybe they a client for a few months down the line instead of today. LinkedIn in as a great way to take a name and turn it into a picture of a person or company along with a way to contact them and see what they’re putting out there. It also allows you to see their connections and find more potential clients. Typically, people in similar business or career stages cluster. So, what if this person was a “miss”? You can also check out their company to see what things you should avoid.

Call My Bluff, I Dare You

Recruiters are like a fungus: they bloom, you wipe them out, they lie in wait, and return with equal or greater power later. At first, I ignored them or declined connections. After a while, I wondered what they would do if I asked for a part-time, remote contract. When I did, a lot of them backed off and didn’t come back. However, there were a few who started a discussion.

I think of these as the “good” recruiters. They didn’t give up when I gave them these difficult requirements, they started to ask why I needed them and what types of negotiation I’d be willing to do. I started building potential work schedules in my head: 20 hours per week onsite, 30 hours per week remote, or fully remote 3 month contract. Surprisingly, they went out and came back with jobs meeting these criteria. Not only that, they frequently followed up to tell me how the search was going and which companies were interested in my work proposal.

The takeaway: if you can come up with a job worth talking to a recruiter for, they might find it for you.

Tales From The Git Keeper: Ain’t No Rest For The Overworked

When we are navigating through life, we often hear about the importance of boundaries. Boundaries come in different forms: ownership, intimacy, and work/life balance. Here is one of several cases where my work/life boundaries were crossed in the course of my employment.

Background

I was on a team as a sort of floating engineer working on some architectural designs rather than specific features or operations. My manager requested my help on an urgent project for 2 weeks and assured me it would bump me up the list for promotion, something I’d been working toward for the past 6 months. The catch was having to put aside some of the architecture work but I thought it would be a nice addition to my highlight reel.

In another part of my life, a close friend was going to be married 3 weeks from the day I was asked to help on this project. I had accepted the invitation and booked my flights several months prior as well as sending out the usual out of office calendar notices.

Incident

They didn’t warn me that I’d be working with someone who didn’t know the system. Instead of 2 weeks, it was 2 weeks of me working and 1 week of me undoing the mistakes of my coworker. As the deadline neared, I had increasingly detailed documentation of the remaining work and release plan so someone else could pick it up. I lived under the assumption that work would bend to my vacation plans, not the other way around. Until this conversation:

Project Manager: Hey, so is this going to be done by tomorrow?

Me: That’s not up to me. I have all the changes lined up and the validation scripts ready but I can’t make anything else go faster.

Project Manager: And you’re going on vacation?

Me: Yes…

Project Manager: Too bad we can’t cancel that, huh?

Me: No, my friend is getting married so it’s immovable.

Project Manager: Ah… well, let’s see what happens tomorrow.

My manager had been coaching me on not being so angry at work (gee, I wonder why that kept happening) and I knew if I indicated any emotional response to this, I’d be getting a stern talking to (this manager was a jerk). So, on the outside I just vaguely smiled and went back to work but on the inside I was calling this shithead all kinds of names and preparing to quit if they tried to make me stay.

I did go on my vacation and I did meet my deadline.

Aftermath

You might want to know what happened to the project, the promotion, and the project manager. Here’re the answers:

  • The project manager was fired for incompetence.
  • When I returned from vacation, the project was delayed and didn’t need me to work like crazy, under threat of losing vacation beforehand.
  • 4 months later my manager informed me that my work to this project “didn’t count” towards my promotion. He remains a jerk to this day, or so I’ve heard.
  • The walking incident of a coworker had been ejected from the team. It turns out he wasn’t only ignorant of the system but of how to do anything.
  • The only part of the project that worked without completely destroying all other integration points was the piece I implemented. It’s not because I’m a superstar developer. It’s because the team was all new randomly hired people except for me and one other guy. They had no chance.
  • My documentation was passed along and worshiped as the only documentation for the entire project that described how to validate anything.

What Did I Learn

  • Shit rolls downhill: Despite my intense irritation with the project manager, I saw he was under a lot of strain to get this project done. He was being asked to make a lot of personal sacrifices to make this thing happen. So when he implied that I would need to make sacrifices too, I wasn’t surprised but I didn’t think he’d cross that line.
  • Never trust your manager when his ass is on the line: Until the sudden foray into the project, I didn’t know anything about it. After getting back from vacation, I gained more context on what was happening. Apparently, there was this political battle between two directors and one of them was mine, trying to make a point about the effectiveness of his team. I got pulled in, not because it would benefit my career, but because it would benefit his.
  • The real deadline is when everyone else is ready: I had accepted the deadline given to me because I didn’t know anything about the project when I was enlisted. What I found out later showed me there wasn’t a snowball’s chance in hell that any other team was going to be ready by the deadline. The fact that my work made my team ready was just an excuse for the asshat director to throw shit on other teams. It didn’t matter that I did the work, did it well, and did it on time.
  • A pattern emerges: Now that I had a history of Hail Mary passes, guess who came knocking at my non-existent, open-space door at the next crisis? That’s right, asshat director. So I started saying ‘no’. And then I changed teams. And then I quit the company. Sometimes my old coworkers tell me he says he’ll hire me back anytime. I hope he’s not holding his breath.

I Dislike EAPs

adult business close up friendship
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

If you work for a company in the United States, you may have seen “EAP” as an offered benefit. This stands for “Employee Assistance Program“. Along with some wellness benefits, it often offers some coverage for counseling or therapy. At first glance, it looks like a good way for the company to support their employees. Certainly, funding gym memberships or paying for exercise equipment is great. What about those counseling sessions though?

How It Works

If your company provides this benefit you are eligible to receive 3 sessions fully covered regardless of your health plan with an in-network counselor or therapist. This can range from career counseling to treatment of mental illness. I think you may even be able to make a case for a personal trainer to fall under this umbrella.

Typically, EAP benefits are provided through a third-party company whose website you go to for providers. Often this website has a ton of other resources. I’ve seen company discounts and coupons along with tests to tell you whether you’re cheating on your spouse (no, it doesn’t make sense). Often the material seems like a random collection of generic advice and then that search engine for people in network.

How It Doesn’t Work

I see the EAP plan as someone offering me a towel when my house is flooding: it’s a nice gesture and might help me feel a little better but doesn’t solve my problem. The flood, in my case, would be a series of stress related mental health issues and the towel is those 3 counseling sessions. These are a few things I’ve learned that make this benefit useless:

  • It takes 1 to 2 sessions to determine if you can work with a particular counselor. Sometimes it can take longer for the therapist to evaluate whether they can help you. There goes those 3 sessions and you got nothing for it.
  • Your physician may have a “care team” with a counselor included. This is super useful when both of them can work together to give you the best combination of medication and behavioral treatment. Oh, but that counselor isn’t in the EAP network, even if they are in your health plan network. So much for saving some medical expenses.
  • Finally, therapists hate dealing with insurance, much like everyone does. Unfortunately, the EAP is an additional round of paperwork for them. So, the counselors that are successful and well-liked by their clients don’t really need the additional traffic boost the EAP gives them. So guess who’s left in the EAP search engine?

What Needs To Change?

I don’t know. I only have my own case to look at and say “EAP doesn’t work or make sense for me” but who knows, maybe it isn’t just lip service and people have been helped by it. However, to make this something other than an irritating reminder of how poor our mental health support is, here are some things that I think would make it better:

  • Remove the in-network limitation
  • Cover 2 introductory sessions with any new therapist up to once every 3 months (supporting those searching for the right one)
  • Allow an additional covered session for “qualifying life events” such as divorce, bereavement, or a new medical diagnosis
  • Provide career and life advice to employees generated by the company’s HR department, not some generic employee support company that tells you how to shop for a tie

In Conclusion…

I hope you learned more about what EAPs are and I hope they are more useful to you than they’ve been for me.

 

Course Review: Docker for Java Developers

This post will go over a course Lynda.com (company owned by LinkedIn and by extension Microsoft) to learn about Docker for Java Developers.

Lynda.com Course

Docker

Java 

Usefulness And Overview

Currently, the course topic is relevant. The paradigm of “containerization” or releasing your software as self-contained collections of related packages and dependencies called “containers” is catching on quickly across services in the industry. Even though this says it’s for Java developers, it’s not really Java specific. All the concepts and commands used are language independent to a certain extent. The part that the course missed out on was Kubernetes, a fast growing solution from Google related to container management.

Is this particular course a good use of your time to learn about Docker? Maybe. A lot of the content was easily found in documentation or by searching online. If you like information presented in sequence with context, yes, this is a good choice. Otherwise, it may be tedious or too shallow in topic coverage.

The course follows a mini-lecture with demo format. You can copy the course materials and follow along with the demo. The course starts off assuming you don’t have Docker set up. The content begins with installation and follows a simple web app through containerization, deployment, release and scaling. It further goes through monitoring options and maintenance commands.

Course Details

  • The instructor introduces Docker by showing you the download websites and how to install on various operating systems.
  • He introduces the course material by showing how to use git to clone the course materials and use them.
  • The first use of Docker is to create a container with the sample application and use the start and stop commands along with options. List running containers as well.
  • Next, the website is deployed using the container and various health checks are shown. An important not here was how container health is different than application health.
  • The lecture shows how to automate the use of containers in a build and release flow.
  • Container sharing, tagging, and maintenance in a container store are shown along with best practices for tagging.
  • Next was a more complex application with multiple services with a container that needed to be started up in a particular order (application and database).
  • He went over the use of container contexts to allow running multiple instances of a container on the same host.
  • This then moved into more advanced use of containers including swarm mode with rolling updates, certificate rotation, auto-scaling, and fail over.
  • He went over container maintenance and use of the master node to manage other nodes in the cluster including the use of drain and pause commands.
  • Another advanced topic covered was storage nodes and how to use container independent storage or distributed storage solutions with containers.
  • As the last topic, he went over tools and other plugins for monitoring including the stats CLI tool, Prometheus and C Advisor.
  • He did not go over Kubernetes but recommended it as a future topic.

What Doesn’t Kill You Slowly Grinds Away Your Sanity: Psychological Burnout

Often you will hear people say that someone is “burnt out” or “I was really burnt out on [project/team/company].” Casually, this means you are exhausted or temporarily stressed on a team. This often is thought of as a passing condition. Unfortunately, there is a more formal type of burnout called “psychological burnout” or “occupational burnout.” Here I’ll talk about what this is, how it can ruin your life, and how to fix it.

IMG_20181023_092942
Top: this is your brain. Bottom: this is your brain crushed by burnout.

What Is It?

Burnout is a pathologic syndrome in which prolonged occupational stress leads to emotional and physical depletion and ultimately to the development of maladaptive behaviors (e.g., cynicism, depersonalization, hostility, detachment).

https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/nursing-and-health-professions/burnout-psychology

This is a fairly formal definition and doesn’t include a few key points:

  • This type of burnout can last years
  • You may develop long lasting mental health problems such as depression, alcoholism, and eating disorders
  • It can take months or years to recover
  • By the time you notice your “maladaptive behaviors”, it’s already happened to you

You May Have Psychological Burnout If…

We are all different and the signs of this type of condition are different per person too. On top of that, we have such poor mental health support (in North America) that we don’t recognize these problems as repeated exposure to stressful situations. Remember, these “symptoms” are a stress reaction, not a personality trait.

What To Look For:

  • No matter how hard you try to stay optimistic, you can’t see anything going well and you constantly fall into cynicism and criticism at work or elsewhere.
  • You take a lot of breaks at work to get away from work with activities like eating, drinking, or over-exercising.
  • Your week follows a pattern like this: work Monday to Friday, sleep Saturday to Sunday.
  • You become more resentful of people asking you do to things even if they are simple.
  • You start blaming yourself for not working hard enough, not being tough enough, or not being smart enough to overcome the challenges you have at work.
  • You enter a protective combat mode: you are argumentative and defensive about any changes or comments related to your work. When you look back on what caused it, these are usually no attacks on you but you can’t stop yourself from reacting that way.
  • You feel isolated. This can be emotional isolation: no one is there to help you, you need to fix this all on your own, your coworkers or boss don’t have your back. Or physical isolation: you start working from home more, you don’t want to participate in any team activities, you stop responding to emails or chats messages.
  • And much, much more…

The worst part is the slow creep: you won’t notice a big, sudden change. Instead, you’ll find yourself here without knowing how and you’re not sure how to get out.

Causes

When we talk about burn out in the casual sense, it’s usually caused by a tight deadline, late nights, or the frenzied kind of work we associate with “crunch time”. Interestingly, this isn’t the same as what causes psychological burnout.

This is how I sum up the cause of psychological burnout:

You put effort into something and you got no result (or not the one you expected).

Here are some examples of how that shows up:

  • You are asked to write a design or build a feature and just as you are halfway through, it’s cancelled
  • You put up a code review and no one reviews it for days or weeks
  • You prepare a proposal for a new feature, project, initiative, anything and it’s brushed aside by your manager or team
  • You write a masterpiece of an email reporting some fabulous result or finding and no one responds
  • You ask questions or make comments in team meetings and they are ignored

Some other causes you’ll see listed on medical websites call out other things like dysfunctional teams, lack of control, or boredom. To me, these fall into work that’s not getting the result you expect. If you are trying to talk to your team and they don’t respond, that’s effort wasted. If you find out your project was cut because you have no say in your team road map, more effort wasted. I find that any action by the team or company that sends the message of “you did all this work and we don’t care” is hugely damaging. It makes sense that people withdraw, start thinking nothing they do matters, and, of course, “develop maladaptive coping behaviors.”

When It’s Too Late

Too late to me means you’ve gone so far into your emotional hell that you start to see your relationships, productivity, and physical health suffer. “Too late” doesn’t mean you can’t get better, it just means that you will need to make a significant change in your lifestyle to recover from your new and horrible condition. Here are a few examples of what too late looks like:

  • You a few beers after work to get rid of the unhappiness built up during the day
  • You can’t remember the last time you slept well and find yourself self medicating with pot, alcohol, sleep medication or other substances to get to sleep at night
  • You’re are late to work because you can’t get yourself out of bed anymore
  • Your coworkers and managers tell you you’re angry and critical
  • Your friends are telling you to quit or they’re not talking with you as much because they’re tired of your work rants
  • You’ve been to visit your doctor to either get anti-depressants or increase doses
  • You have other minor physical problems building up: regular indigestion, random aches and pains, sprains, headaches, frequent colds or flues

These signs differ for each person. Some choose to drink while others over-exercise. Some will get angry and others consider self-harm. Either way, substance abuse, uncontrolled emotion, mood altering prescriptions, and a decline in personal relationships mean this is now taking over your life and something needs to change.

How To Recover

How did this happen? It’s complicated. A lot of different pieces came together at the same time to create this situation. To solve it, it’s also going to take a lot of different pieces coming together to work to get you better. Here are a few of the bigger things you can do to find your path to recovery:

  • Go to therapist or counselor: this person will help you identify the situations leading to burnout and track your improvement or lack thereof over time
  • See a doctor for mental health evaluation: you may have stress induced depression, anxiety, ulcers, or insomnia that needs medications and management with a physician
  • Take a break: take time off for as long as you can. By taking time off, you will see how unhealthy your life has become and seek better opportunities.
  • Change jobs: consider changing teams, managers, or companies depending on what you learn from introspection and counseling
  • Change careers: many people choose to change careers to escape the damage of burnout. Going back to school, choosing to invest in family, or becoming a travel blogger are common escape routes.

Make sure you do something. If you choose inaction, you’re damaging yourself physically, mentally, and potentially financially (medical bills, being fired).

Finally, find things that counteract the cause of burnout:

Do things that turn your efforts into rewards.

It’s Not That Bad Yet

If you’re reading through these signs and think “I’m putting effort and not seeing results but I’m just frustrated, not a depressed alcoholic” then you’re in luck! You can avoid the worst by getting away from your situation early. When you start to see people ignoring, cancelling, brushing off, or otherwise not returning anything on your effort, evaluate whether or not it’s worth staying where you are. It’s not just about wasting your time, it’s about damaging your motivation and joy in working. You can use mindfulness to identify what is going well and what isn’t to get yourself moving in a better direction.

Tales from the Git Keeper: Christmas is Canceled

This is a tale about how I had to work through Christmas as a result of mostly bad luck.

20180925_100433.jpg

Background

I was working at a large tech company on a new product that had been available less than a year. Since this was the first Christmas for this product, the company wasn’t sure what to expect for demand or cost of failure. I was working on this product for almost 2 years. There were 3 other people on my team. The most senior member was out for parental leave, the next was out on vacation, and the last had been on the team for 2 months out of college. To be clear, I was on my own for the first Christmas period of a reportedly hot, new product. What makes matters even worse is how the product generated scale. People could buy the product any time but it only generated traffic when it was registered to a new user. We could not predict when this would happen. We suspected it would happen for several million customers between 6 am and 3 pm on Christmas day in my timezone. This was projected to bring in triple to dectuple our existing load.

Week Before Christmas

The above circumstances should be a sign that risk needs to be mitigated. Unfortunately for me, this didn’t go quite as well as it could have. Why:

  1. The range of projected traffic was several orders of magnitude wide. This means we could have gotten 10 requests per second or 1000. That was the best estimates.
  2. When running scaling tests, we could generate a specific number of requests but no way of understanding what data should be in the requests. Should it be 10 requests with 10 different customers or 10 with the same customer? It turns out that made a massive scaling difference to my services.
  3. The company created tier-1 SWAT teams to resolve issues across the product before paging the product specific engineers. These people had generic sets of instructions for common problems. What this didn’t include was how to manage scaling for the database we were using. As it turns out, the prescribed action was exactly the opposite of what should have been done.
  4. Finally, the company actually had no idea of the impact of failure. We just assumed all failure was bad.

On a personal note, I decided to schedule going to a friend’s house just for the Christmas dinner. I was away from family and thought I’d be able to spare 3 hours for dinner when I was assured nothing should go wrong. I even though it would be an uneventful Christmas where I could relax, eat, and be happy. I was wrong.

Day of Christmas

7 am: Paged awake and told to get on a conference call immediately.

NOTE: Once in a conference call or chat, you need to be constantly available and are asked for updates every 5 min regardless of how boring, tense, or upsetting it is.

7:10 am: I join a chat room with my manager, my skip manager, the SWAT team engineer, the SWAT team engineer’s manager, and my director. That’s right: 2 engineers and 4 managers.

7:30 am: Figured out the problem. For those who are technical, we had an SQL database with a limited number of connections and all connections were timing out due to long running queries. This means that all requests were taking really long and failing. This is one of the reasons why people don’t like using SQL in large scale systems. The only way to recover from this is to stop traffic to the SQL database until the connection pool is no longer thrashing and then gradually increase traffic until you start seeing connection timeouts again. Reduce traffic and keep it throttled to just before connection timeouts start. Normally, you should determine this rate of traffic before a massive event so you don’t have to do it on the fly.

7:35 am: I go to the chat window to explain my findings.

Chat with Manager, Skip Manager, Director, SWAT Engineer, SWAT Manager

Me: Hey, I found the issue.

SWAT Eng: Yes, me too. I’m scaling up the service.

Me: NO DONT

Me: DO NOT SCALE UP

Me: It will make it worse!

SWAT Eng: I can’t cancel the scale request. But what’s wrong? It’s running out of connections. That means we should scale up.

Me: No, the database is running out of connections, not the hosts. Scaling up the hosts is effectively DDOSing the database. You need to scale down.

Skip Manager: Can you explain why?

Me: I can but later. We need to scale down.

Director: Just scale down.

7:40 am: Finally take my face of my dining room table where it slammed after seeing them scale up. I next described what was happening to the service and how to recover. The SWAT engineer and manager left the room since I was now on point to handle this.

8 am – 1 pm: Repeatedly scaling down and up to find the safest traffic level. Each scaling action took 30 min and an additional 10 min of monitoring. All throughout I needed to give detailed reports to the managers in the room.

1 pm: We reached a stable state where services were running at maximum capacity but they still couldn’t keep up with load. Skip Manager correctly identified a possibility of improving database performance to increase throughput. He started taking a snapshot of the database to make a read replica. A week later, that snapshot still hadn’t completed.

3 pm: I hit the point of emotional breakdown after not eating, washing, sleeping, and realizing I couldn’t go to Christmas dinner. I may have curled up in a ball and cried for a few minutes.

3:15 pm: Me and the managers worked on identifying database optimization and attempting them. We finally gave up after realizing we couldn’t make any changes to a live database due to resource contention.

4 pm: Inhaled some instant ramen. This was the first food that day.

6 pm to 7 pm: Casual chatting about our favorite old video games and movies while waiting for SQL EXPLAIN and long running query analysis.

7 pm – 8 pm: We admit that we cannot scale further and no amount of SQL work can be done without a read replica. Additionally, I started making another snapshot in hopes that we could get two working at different times to minimize data loss.

8 pm – 8:30 pm: Excuse myself for 30 min to shower.

8:30 pm to 9 pm: We connect with other teams to determine impact to customer. Turns out, there was none. No one noticed or cared. Good to know I worked a 16 hour day under high stress for no reason.

9 pm to 11 pm: We created lists of items to monitor, action items for after the Christmas traffic, data we needed for recover, and how to communicate to partner teams what the outage was. We agreed to come back online tomorrow morning at 7 am to see how the snapshots were going and to check on the issue.

Day After Christmas (AKA Boxing Day)

7 am: Get up and run to my computer so I’m not paged for being late for check-in.

7:05 am – 8 am: Confirming that nothing has changed, no one cares that we have crashed and burned, and the database replicas are not done yet.

8 am – 9 am: Discussion with managers what to do now.

9 am: Repeating previous attempts to improve indexes on the database and search for slow queries now that the traffic has decreased. Also collect data for the reports to be filed during the next business day.

12 pm: We throw in the towel and decide to re-baseline the entire system when we get in to work after the holidays.

Christmas “Gifts”

Much like Ebenezer, I also learned a few things through this Christmas trauma:

  • Being on call sucks. Before this I was okay with being woken up at 2 am once in a while or working a few hours on weekends. No more.
  • Being a manager sucks. My managers shielded me from the verbal impaling going on in the manager level meetings but I heard about it.
  • I learned where my breaking point was in terms of working on something stressful for an extended period of time. Then I kept working past it. Don’t do that.
  • After this, I told people to f*ck right off if they couldn’t prove their problem was causing financial loss. No way am I going to waste my personal time on something that doesn’t matter again.
  • There is a large community of sleep-deprived, beer drinking engineers commiserating over this and similar experiences all the time. Be nice to them.
  • When a big operational event is planned, have a backup so the primary can shower, eat, and cry in a corner if they need to.
  • While it didn’t erase the trauma, trading my Christmas and half day of work for another week of paid time off was something I asked for and enjoyed taking.

Two years later…

Me: I quit.

Manager: Left the organization. Still at the company.

Skip Manager: Quit.

Director: Left the organization. Still at the company.

SWAT Engineer: Quit.

SWAT Manager: Left the organization. Still at the company.

The Service That Failed: Deleted. It was rewritten 1 year later.

No one involved in this incident stayed on the product longer than 2 years after the event. Not even the service lasted.

An Independent Venture: Customer Number… 0

Finding customers as a freelancer or contractor starting out is hard. These are some failed attempts at getting customers and what I learned.

 

Prospect 1: Work For Free

The first prospective client I spoke with was through a Slack networking channel. He saw when I posted I was looking for freelance work and asked me to join his other Slack channel that pooled freelancers. He said his team posted for freelance work needed on projects and those in the channel could claim the work.

This sounded fine. Until he described the work he needed me to do. For free. He mentioned that since I wasn’t an expert, he didn’t want to pay me. We spent some time negotiating  a lower fee with specific deadlines and expectations. It didn’t pan out and I got the impression he just didn’t want to pay for the work.

Prospect 2: Online Course Instructor

The second prospective client was found through Upwork. This position was for teaching a few lectures on common topics like Git, Test Driven Development, and DevOps. This sounded like a piece of cake. When I contacted the hiring department, we agreed upon expectations as well as pay. They asked me to do a sample lecture on a topic of my choice as an interview for the position. I did well on the interview. They sent me a contract to sign. And I never heard from them again. Sadly, I never got the contact info of the department that had reviewed and approved my interview, otherwise this might have turned into actual work.

Prospect 3: StartUp Chats

On several different occasions, I’ve met with CTOs, CEOs, or COOs of various startups to discuss potential freelance work. All of the startups are in the same position: they have a good base of engineers, they can’t afford to hire more, and they need a few more people temporarily to get their project to the next milestone. For each of them I described what specific work I could do on their project, for how long, and for what rate. Every single one of them said “I can definitely find a way to have us work together.” No, I didn’t really believe them but at some point one of them might be telling the truth. One of them was a friend of mine and he kept me updated on the contract progress. He was slowly suffocating under a mountain of work to the point where he didn’t even had time to list enough of it to create a freelancing contract. I’ve chosen to assume that all of the startups have similar challenges and won’t sweat the loss. On the other hand, I also gave them my contact information rather than getting theirs. This meant I couldn’t follow up with them. Now I know I always need to get a business card.

How did I meet these people?

Learning From Failure

I don’t see these failed attempts at landing clients failures since each time I learn something new. With the first client I learned that people will ask me to work for free and I need to be firm on saying no. With the second client, I learned that talking to hiring departments is a waste of time if my contract will be with a different department. With all the startups, I learned the importance of following up. A little nudge is enough to get you a lot of work.